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E. Kristin Anderson will write your bio.
You know that part where a magazine asks you for a "short bio?" Let me do that for you. $15 gets you something around 50 words of exquisite biographical information.

Examples:

doodlerTM lives in the snowy woodlands of upstate New York. She has a pet Yeti. You're jealous.

neurotype spends her time in and outside of Chicago, where she can be found writing science fiction, entertaining hookers, and writing science fiction about hookers. Her work has been seen in magazines.

TheMaidenInBlack is a goddamn classy Italian cyclops with at least one dog. When not wrestling sewer rats, she writes sonnets on her balcony.

tiganusi has never ever rolled a cigarette using a page from a bible. His work has appeared in at least three magazines that you've heard of and his photographs have given at least one old man a stroke.

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*Can't make it to an event? Get a signed copy anyway!*
Order DEAR TEEN ME from The Book Spot in Round Rock, TX, and I will sign and personalize your book for you! They ship! Email me directly about A GUIDE FOR THE PRACTICAL ABDUCTEE or A JAB OF DEEP URGENCY and I'll sign & send you swag with your purchase.

May 8, 2015: Westbrook High School in Westbrook, Maine!
Yep, you read that right! I'll be speaking at the high school from whence I graduated. This will be for current students and faculty/staff only. But I am too excited not to put this here.

July 11, 2015: SCBWI Monthly Meeting at Book People in Austin, TX
I'll be giving a talk on revision entitled "Re-spin Your Tale like a Poet" for SCBWI members and folks interested in joining the organization. Books will be available for purchase and signing.

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Yes, you can hire me! If you're interested in hiring an editor to help you with your manuscript, a mentor or coach to help you with your career, a proofreader for your poetry, or an industry professional to take a look at your query, I hope you'll consider soliciting my help through Yellow Bird Editors. Our rates are competitive and testimonials are listed on the site. There are many services offered in almost every genre and with so many editors and authors working at Yellow Bird, there is surely someone who will suit your needs, even if it isn't me!

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GODDESSMODE! An Interview with Cool Skull Press

Journal Entry: Fri Jul 24, 2015, 7:47 PM
FROM THE DESK OF E. KRISTIN ANDERSON:

So when I first heard about the anthology that Cool Skull Press was putting out an anthology of video game poems, all written by women and non-binary authors, I was so in. Except I missed the deadline. And then they emailed me and were all like "can you send us some things?" and I was all like "YAAASSSS" (except, you know, super professional) and now I get to say that I'm in GODDESSMODE, which is so very excellent (I've seen the insides and everything) and I absolutely cannot wait for everyone else to get their hands on it. Meanwhile, I thought I'd check in with August Smith over at Cool Skull Press to see how this fantastic anthology came about. Here's our interview.

Cook Skull Press, July 2015.
Cook Skull Press, July 2015.

E. Kristin Anderson: What attracts you to video games as a subject for poetry? This isn’t Cool Skull Press’ first video game poetry book.

August Smith: That’s a difficult question because I feel like the answer is very nebulous. I can pick out a few standout reasons, though. On one level, it’s really just a form of nostalgia-mining for me. I get to revisit these characters, words, landscapes, and ideas that I spent a lot of with as a child, and somehow I find that pleasurable and emotionally resonant. I think the impulse is similar to the impulse behind people writing fanfiction-- there’s something powerful in taking these expansive fictional universes that are outside of my control and modding them in any way I like. And readers that were raised on these games have an easy emotional access point with my video game work. I received so many emails from people who were excited about my MARIO KART 64 chapbook because they used to spend hours playing it with their siblings so many years ago. There is an emotional connection to these games and it’s not superficial.

On a more philosophical level, I like to think of video games as small self-contained universes, operating by their own rules, existing outside time and physical location. Video game poetry is basically ekphrastic poetry, and yet it feels fundamentally different from writing about paintings or songs or movies because we, as players, inhabit these games, we give them a soul, and we effect the way these universes work. Thus, we can think of games as small and easily-digestible metaphors for our own universe, and it’s at that intersection that I like to explore.

EKA: Tell me about the title GODDESSMODE. How did it come about, and what does it mean to you?

AS: The title GODDESSMODE is a play off the game trope “godmode”, which is usually a cheat or power-up that grants invincibility. When you activate “godmode” in a game, your usual reaction is to start fucking everything up. It allows you to charge into the middle of huge angry mobs or walk across lava and spikes or throw grenades at your own feet and walk away unscathed. So I think the name works as a simple analogy for a collection that aims to face its opposition head on and without trepidation.

Cool Skull Press, February 2015.
Cool Skull Press, February 2015.

EKA: What were your goals when you decided to put out a call for submissions for this book?

AS: For a while before Cool Skull Press even started, I had the idea to do an anthology of poetry and writing about video games. After I got the ball rolling on the press and started connecting with other similarly-minded publishers, I quickly realized that this idea has been done 1) multiple times by other presses, and 2) better and more thoroughly than I ever could (for example, Sidekick Books has some absolutely killer video game poetry anthologies). This realization occurred at the same time the gaming community at large was really struggling with gender critiques: the hideous harassment campaign against Zoe Quinn, the death threats against Anita Sarkeesian, etc. These two things became the impetus for the collection.

The real driving goal behind the book was to provide a platform for a variety of voices and approaches. If non-male individuals’ voices are being suppressed in some way, the best way to combat that (it seems to me) is to create a place/space/platform where their voices are encouraged. For this reason, I didn’t necessarily want every piece in the book to be explicitly about gender (though many of the best pieces in the collection are), but instead I wanted a wealth of subjects and styles. Your Nintendo Power erasure poems are a perfect example, E.!

EKA: What was the curation process like? You must have gotten a lot of really interesting submissions on this topic.

AS: Well for starters, I felt a bit weird about curating this collection myself, since I’m a dude. That seems a bit evil-overlordy, like, “Here’s a platform for your work! But I’m the guy and I get to pick what goes in the book!” So I pulled together some editors and friends of mine (E. E. Scott, Catherine Bailey, Ben Rogers, Dawn Gabriel) and gave them the first pass at the submissions. Then I boiled their responses down into the final selection.

We definitely did get some interesting submissions. We got a couple of submissions that were actual games, which got me thinking about how to perhaps marry the anthology/literary journal release model and independently created video games. Maybe that’s somewhere in Cool Skull’s future.

Cool Skull Press, July 25.
Cool Skull Press, July 25.

EKA: The gaming world is often NOT a safe space for females and non-binary individuals. What do you think can be done to change this, both for hardcore gamers and the casual player?

AS: Again, it’s hard for me to say since I don’t think I’m an expert on this topic and also I’m a dude, which affects my perception of the situation at hand. What I can say is this: if “gamers” want video games to be considered art and taken seriously (which, it seems, many of them do), the field has to be open to critiques, be they feminist and gender-related critiques, aesthetic critiques, Marxist critiques, I don’t care, whatever. This does not mean you have to agree with said critiques. And in fact, if you don’t agree with them, explore the reasons why you disagree like a civil human being. But to violently suppress them with death threats, slut-shaming, whatever, that’s just being reactionary, and in the end you’re going to end up as villains on an episode of Law & Order.

I feel like whenever there is a tangible shift in inclusion, there is always a strong and reactive pushback. Video games, especially over the past, say, 7 years, have really risen in prominence, artistic intent, and general userbase. So now we’re seeing the pushback from those deeply entrenched in that world. And like anything, this pushback will gradually fall by the wayside as gaming is woven into the fabric of our cultural narrative.

It’d be great to expedite that process.

EKA: I’d love to hear more about the striking cover art. How did you choose an artist, and did y’all collaborate to come up with this beautiful look? What were the goals when y’all were creating this cover?

AS: One of the first submissions we received was a collection of visual art from a woman in Sweden named Hanna Rajs Lundström. She’s written a book about Beyoncé and a book about Buffy the Vampire Slayer; just, in general, a really cool artist. The cover image is one of her submissions, and I immediately loved how it somehow gives off the feel of video game cover art while remaining abstract and glitch-like. It just seems very Cool Skull. The lettering was done by an artist friend of mine, Kayla Karaszewski, and she was an absolute pleasure to work with. It all came together very quickly and intuitively. Kayla and I are going to be working on some Cool Skull Press t-shirts next, I think.

EKA: How did you choose the charities to support? And have they been at all involved with the creation of the book?

girlswhocode

AS:
I knew I wanted to support Feminist Frequency because Anita Sarkeesian is really enacting some cultural changes that I support. She’s really ruffling some feathers, as it were. I also wanted to unambiguously define this book in direct opposition with the kind of people behind the whole #gamergate thing.

But I also wanted to support a charity with wider scope. Catherine Bailey suggested Girls Who Code, and I liked the idea; it’s tangentially related to video games, but has its sights set on an arguably larger problem: the gender gap in technological fields. I like the balance of supporting both organizations: on one hand, we have a very video game-centered thing, and on the other, we have something that goes beyond video games.

And no, unfortunately they haven’t been involved! I tried contacting both organizations but got little response. That’s okay though, they have more important things going on than to reply to a little indie press like mine, I imagine.

EKA: What do you hope readers will get out of GODDESSMODE?

AS: I hope readers are entertained, pleasurably perplexed, inspired to action or creation, and intellectually stimulated. The spread of work we have in this modest collection hits all these bases for me, and I hope it does with others.

EKA: What’s next for Cool Skull Press?

AS: T-Shirts! More high-quality chapbooks! I have a super cool secret project in the works that’s probably like more than a year off but who knows. So far I’m taking it one project at a time. I’m happy to take a little breather after GODDESSMODE, though.



Thanks, August! Here's hoping GODDESSMODE kills it with readers.

http://www.ekristinanderson.com


Journal History

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PinkyMcCoversong
E. Kristin Anderson
Artist | Professional | Literature
United States
My name is Emily, but if you're looking for my published work, you should Google E. Kristin Anderson. (Ask me and I'll tell you the why-I-need-a-pen-name story.) I write poetry (for everyone) and fiction (for young adults and children) and nonfiction (sometimes). I'm the co-editor of the nonfiction anthology DEAR TEEN ME (Zest Books, 2012) based on the website DearTeenMe.com, where authors write letters to their teen selves. I have two poetry chapbooks out: A JAB OF DEEP URGENCY (Finishing Line Press) and A GUIDE FOR THE PRACTICAL ABDUCTEE (Red Bird Chapbooks). I'm an online editor at Hunger Mountain and a contributing editor at Found Poetry Review . I blog at EKristinAnderson.com about books and writing and my bizarro life here in Austin, TX. If you're looking for editorial or mentoring servies, I'm a member of Yellow Bird Editors, a group of industry professionals offering these and other services for professionals as well as beginning writers and teens.

I grew up in Westbrook, Maine and went to Connecticut College in the beautiful New London, CT, and have a fancy-sounding degree in Classics. Once upon a time I lived in Brooklyn and worked at The New Yorker magazine and sometimes I have dreams that I have to go into the office and make the magazine and can't remember how. ATX, though? It's a great home. I like to take photographs with toy and vintage cameras. Don't listen to anyone who says watching television will rot your brain -- some of my best ideas have come from TV.

Scroll down for a list of upcoming events and information on my editorial and coaching services.
Interests

Deviousness Award

Deviousness Award
`PinkyMcCoversong brings a type of dedication and enthusiasm that's a fantastic asset to our literature community. A constant inspiration and mentor to many, Emily has an eclectic background that has allowed her to develop a gallery filled with poetry and prose that will keep you glued and eager for more. An already published writer, Emily brought the "Dear Teen Me" concept to the fore in our deviantART community, and has continued to inspire writers young and old to participate. We're absolutely delighted to kickstart our 13th Birthday celebrations by bestowing the Deviousness Award for August 2013 to`PinkyMcCoversong.
-awarded August 2013

Activity


GODDESSMODE! An Interview with Cool Skull Press

Journal Entry: Fri Jul 24, 2015, 7:47 PM
FROM THE DESK OF E. KRISTIN ANDERSON:

So when I first heard about the anthology that Cool Skull Press was putting out an anthology of video game poems, all written by women and non-binary authors, I was so in. Except I missed the deadline. And then they emailed me and were all like "can you send us some things?" and I was all like "YAAASSSS" (except, you know, super professional) and now I get to say that I'm in GODDESSMODE, which is so very excellent (I've seen the insides and everything) and I absolutely cannot wait for everyone else to get their hands on it. Meanwhile, I thought I'd check in with August Smith over at Cool Skull Press to see how this fantastic anthology came about. Here's our interview.

Cook Skull Press, July 2015.
Cook Skull Press, July 2015.

E. Kristin Anderson: What attracts you to video games as a subject for poetry? This isn’t Cool Skull Press’ first video game poetry book.

August Smith: That’s a difficult question because I feel like the answer is very nebulous. I can pick out a few standout reasons, though. On one level, it’s really just a form of nostalgia-mining for me. I get to revisit these characters, words, landscapes, and ideas that I spent a lot of with as a child, and somehow I find that pleasurable and emotionally resonant. I think the impulse is similar to the impulse behind people writing fanfiction-- there’s something powerful in taking these expansive fictional universes that are outside of my control and modding them in any way I like. And readers that were raised on these games have an easy emotional access point with my video game work. I received so many emails from people who were excited about my MARIO KART 64 chapbook because they used to spend hours playing it with their siblings so many years ago. There is an emotional connection to these games and it’s not superficial.

On a more philosophical level, I like to think of video games as small self-contained universes, operating by their own rules, existing outside time and physical location. Video game poetry is basically ekphrastic poetry, and yet it feels fundamentally different from writing about paintings or songs or movies because we, as players, inhabit these games, we give them a soul, and we effect the way these universes work. Thus, we can think of games as small and easily-digestible metaphors for our own universe, and it’s at that intersection that I like to explore.

EKA: Tell me about the title GODDESSMODE. How did it come about, and what does it mean to you?

AS: The title GODDESSMODE is a play off the game trope “godmode”, which is usually a cheat or power-up that grants invincibility. When you activate “godmode” in a game, your usual reaction is to start fucking everything up. It allows you to charge into the middle of huge angry mobs or walk across lava and spikes or throw grenades at your own feet and walk away unscathed. So I think the name works as a simple analogy for a collection that aims to face its opposition head on and without trepidation.

Cool Skull Press, February 2015.
Cool Skull Press, February 2015.

EKA: What were your goals when you decided to put out a call for submissions for this book?

AS: For a while before Cool Skull Press even started, I had the idea to do an anthology of poetry and writing about video games. After I got the ball rolling on the press and started connecting with other similarly-minded publishers, I quickly realized that this idea has been done 1) multiple times by other presses, and 2) better and more thoroughly than I ever could (for example, Sidekick Books has some absolutely killer video game poetry anthologies). This realization occurred at the same time the gaming community at large was really struggling with gender critiques: the hideous harassment campaign against Zoe Quinn, the death threats against Anita Sarkeesian, etc. These two things became the impetus for the collection.

The real driving goal behind the book was to provide a platform for a variety of voices and approaches. If non-male individuals’ voices are being suppressed in some way, the best way to combat that (it seems to me) is to create a place/space/platform where their voices are encouraged. For this reason, I didn’t necessarily want every piece in the book to be explicitly about gender (though many of the best pieces in the collection are), but instead I wanted a wealth of subjects and styles. Your Nintendo Power erasure poems are a perfect example, E.!

EKA: What was the curation process like? You must have gotten a lot of really interesting submissions on this topic.

AS: Well for starters, I felt a bit weird about curating this collection myself, since I’m a dude. That seems a bit evil-overlordy, like, “Here’s a platform for your work! But I’m the guy and I get to pick what goes in the book!” So I pulled together some editors and friends of mine (E. E. Scott, Catherine Bailey, Ben Rogers, Dawn Gabriel) and gave them the first pass at the submissions. Then I boiled their responses down into the final selection.

We definitely did get some interesting submissions. We got a couple of submissions that were actual games, which got me thinking about how to perhaps marry the anthology/literary journal release model and independently created video games. Maybe that’s somewhere in Cool Skull’s future.

Cool Skull Press, July 25.
Cool Skull Press, July 25.

EKA: The gaming world is often NOT a safe space for females and non-binary individuals. What do you think can be done to change this, both for hardcore gamers and the casual player?

AS: Again, it’s hard for me to say since I don’t think I’m an expert on this topic and also I’m a dude, which affects my perception of the situation at hand. What I can say is this: if “gamers” want video games to be considered art and taken seriously (which, it seems, many of them do), the field has to be open to critiques, be they feminist and gender-related critiques, aesthetic critiques, Marxist critiques, I don’t care, whatever. This does not mean you have to agree with said critiques. And in fact, if you don’t agree with them, explore the reasons why you disagree like a civil human being. But to violently suppress them with death threats, slut-shaming, whatever, that’s just being reactionary, and in the end you’re going to end up as villains on an episode of Law & Order.

I feel like whenever there is a tangible shift in inclusion, there is always a strong and reactive pushback. Video games, especially over the past, say, 7 years, have really risen in prominence, artistic intent, and general userbase. So now we’re seeing the pushback from those deeply entrenched in that world. And like anything, this pushback will gradually fall by the wayside as gaming is woven into the fabric of our cultural narrative.

It’d be great to expedite that process.

EKA: I’d love to hear more about the striking cover art. How did you choose an artist, and did y’all collaborate to come up with this beautiful look? What were the goals when y’all were creating this cover?

AS: One of the first submissions we received was a collection of visual art from a woman in Sweden named Hanna Rajs Lundström. She’s written a book about Beyoncé and a book about Buffy the Vampire Slayer; just, in general, a really cool artist. The cover image is one of her submissions, and I immediately loved how it somehow gives off the feel of video game cover art while remaining abstract and glitch-like. It just seems very Cool Skull. The lettering was done by an artist friend of mine, Kayla Karaszewski, and she was an absolute pleasure to work with. It all came together very quickly and intuitively. Kayla and I are going to be working on some Cool Skull Press t-shirts next, I think.

EKA: How did you choose the charities to support? And have they been at all involved with the creation of the book?

girlswhocode

AS:
I knew I wanted to support Feminist Frequency because Anita Sarkeesian is really enacting some cultural changes that I support. She’s really ruffling some feathers, as it were. I also wanted to unambiguously define this book in direct opposition with the kind of people behind the whole #gamergate thing.

But I also wanted to support a charity with wider scope. Catherine Bailey suggested Girls Who Code, and I liked the idea; it’s tangentially related to video games, but has its sights set on an arguably larger problem: the gender gap in technological fields. I like the balance of supporting both organizations: on one hand, we have a very video game-centered thing, and on the other, we have something that goes beyond video games.

And no, unfortunately they haven’t been involved! I tried contacting both organizations but got little response. That’s okay though, they have more important things going on than to reply to a little indie press like mine, I imagine.

EKA: What do you hope readers will get out of GODDESSMODE?

AS: I hope readers are entertained, pleasurably perplexed, inspired to action or creation, and intellectually stimulated. The spread of work we have in this modest collection hits all these bases for me, and I hope it does with others.

EKA: What’s next for Cool Skull Press?

AS: T-Shirts! More high-quality chapbooks! I have a super cool secret project in the works that’s probably like more than a year off but who knows. So far I’m taking it one project at a time. I’m happy to take a little breather after GODDESSMODE, though.



Thanks, August! Here's hoping GODDESSMODE kills it with readers.

http://www.ekristinanderson.com


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New anthology, new magazines, new book deal!

Journal Entry: Sat Jul 11, 2015, 12:20 PM
FROM THE DESK OF E. KRISTIN ANDERSON:

It's really really really hot which is maybe why I haven't written this blog post yet.

BenderGoodNewsEveryone

But I have news. I'll start you off with Silver Birch Press' THE GREAT GATSBY ANTHOLOGY, which just came out. I have an erasure poem in the book, and there are TONS of awesome authors in here. Seriously, tons. It's stupid. Go grab a copy!

Silver Birch Press, June 2015.
Silver Birch Press, June 2015.

And then I had a piece up at Juked online, which was pretty great. It's an erasure from my manuscript  PAUSE FOR AN EPIPHANY (which I'm currently sending out to publishers, huzzah!) and it's one of my favorites -- "If we had a nickel." I used a piece from Allure to write this one. Allure has so many wonderful words in its pages.

ELJ Publications.

And then, crazy as it sounds (it sounds crazy to me, anyway), ELJ Publications picked up my YA memoir in verse, THE SUMMER OF UNRAVELING. What even. I'm so grateful to these editors -- Ariana D. Den Bleyker and Samantha Duncan -- who have shown such faith in me. The memoir will cover several months of my senior year in high school, overlapping into my first few months of college and will discuss my experiences as a bipolar teenager before, during, and after diagnosis. I sold this on proposal, so I still have to write the bulk of the book. Which is scary. But also exhilarating. THE SUMMER OF UNRAVELING will be released in May of 2017 to coincide with National Mental Health Awareness month. ELJ is printing it under their Esperanza Editions imprint -- an imprint that highlights stories of mental illness for the sake of both empowerment and education.

If you haven't read work by my awesome, above-mentioned editors, check them out! They're both so talented and I'm so excited that I get to work with them on a book that is so personal and that will take a lot out of me as a human and as a writer. I can't imagine doing this book with anyone else! (They are also publishing my experimental found poetry chapbook ACOUSTIC BATTERY LIFE in January. SO EXCITED!)

Candlewick Press, July 2012.
Candlewick Press, July 2012.

In other news, I just got back from July's Austin SCBWI meeting where I had the privilege of presenting a talk on using poetry to refine your revision skills. Thank you so much to everyone who came out and especially to those who bought books! I hope folks who enjoyed my talk will also buy books by Ron Koertge and Christine Heppermann, whose narrative poems I used to illustrate my points throughout the talk.

And now, I'm off to write more things. So much planning to do before the Prince chap (PRAY, PRAY, PRAY) hits shelves in October. (Save the date: I'll be launching the book in Austin at Malvern Books on October 25!) So many magazine deadlines to make. So many poems in my notebook that need typing up and revising. And so much delicious mango iced tea to drink. Mmmmmm....

Have a great weekend! I hope you'll share YOUR good news with ME!

http://www.ekristinanderson.com


CRLiterature Journal Header by inknalcohol


It's July!



That means it's both Camp NaNoWriMo and Flash Fiction Month! Huzzah! I, personally, am hoping to complete a revision on a past NaNo novel. We all have goals, and there are lots of ways to go about achieving them. But when it comes to first drafts with deadlines, there are some things you might want to consider, or remember, or just paste on a wall above your desk. Because it's HARD to keep up. There are totally points at which you want to quit, and points where you have no idea what is supposed to happen next, where you feel like you've run out of ideas. BUT. You signed up for this. And I'm holding you to it!

So. Here you go. Pinky's Top Five Survival Tips for Writing Challenges!

1. First drafts suck. 


AndyTheShowMustGoWrong by PinkyMcCoversong

They suck a lot. All of them. Whether you're Nooby McNoobwriter or Stephen King. So give yourself permission to suck. It's okay. You can fix it later.

2. STOP EDITING.


RonNeverHalfAssTwoThings by PinkyMcCoversong
That's for later. Your goal right now is to crank out some words. You have limited time, so you'd better use that time to make more words instead of going back and fixing, deleting, rewriting. Revision is ESSENTIAL. But you have to get that first draft finished first.

3. Find some folks to hold you accountable. 


LeslieTextMeEvery30Seconds by PinkyMcCoversong

Right here on dA, there are tons of writers participating in Camp NaNo and FFM. So find some buddies. Check in with each other. Challenge each other. and keep each other accountable for these goals you set at the beginning of the month.

4. If you get stuck, try something outrageous.


DonnaTommySurpriseFace by PinkyMcCoversong

Sometimes when I get stuck writing a first draft, I write in a bear attack or an explosion or something. Maybe you could try a crazy prompt that you thought you'd never even touch, write something out of your wheelhouse, or have someone walk into the room with a gun. Surprise yourself! Be fearless!

5. Treat yo' self!


Treatyoselftommy by PinkyMcCoversong

Or...write now fun later. Set daily goals (like your one FFM piece for the day, or your x amount of words for the day), and play afterward. You could also set up something with yourself like "after I meet my goal, I get to binge watch Netflix things for two hours" or "no ice cream until after I finish this FFM piece!" 

There you go. Now get out there and get writing. Because that's how we do at CRLiterature

AndyBurtMacklin by PinkyMcCoversong


Skin by Dan Leveille

Comments


Add a Comment:
 
:iconmagicaljoey:
MagicalJoey Featured By Owner Jun 21, 2015   Writer
Your bio things are awesome. Made me smile.
Reply
:iconpinkymccoversong:
PinkyMcCoversong Featured By Owner Jun 21, 2015  Professional Writer
Glad to hear. :)
Reply
:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Edited Jun 6, 2015
:rofl: omgosh, I will have truly arrived if I have an official bio composed by you!... Alas though, I think I have less than 350 points (upends her wallet). Ah me, looks like I'll need to keep my face pressed against the shiny display window, wistfully hopeful... :icongrumpplz:
Or not?
Reply
:iconpinkymccoversong:
PinkyMcCoversong Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2015  Professional Writer
Haha. Let me know. >.>
Reply
:iconirrevocablefate:
IrrevocableFate Featured By Owner May 21, 2015   Writer
You're super rad.
Reply
:iconpinkymccoversong:
PinkyMcCoversong Featured By Owner May 21, 2015  Professional Writer
NO YOU ARE.
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:iconirrevocablefate:
IrrevocableFate Featured By Owner May 22, 2015   Writer
NO, YOU. :stare:
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:iconpinkymccoversong:
PinkyMcCoversong Featured By Owner May 23, 2015  Professional Writer
:iconnouplz:
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(1 Reply)
:iconwordeea:
wordeea Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
thanks for the watch ! and I can't believe I wasn't watching you - done. ;)
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:iconpinkymccoversong:
PinkyMcCoversong Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2015  Professional Writer
<3<3 ditto!
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